Jessica Campbell

  • A scene created out of pieces of carpet portrays a person taking a picture of a portrait in a gallery with a smartphone.
A scene created out of pieces of carpet portrays a person taking a picture of a portrait in a gallery with a smartphone.
  1. Long A person wearing what appears to be a Chicago Cubs jersey, khaki cargo shorts, and grey new balance tennis shoes with white ankle socks is taking a picture with a smartphone of an abstract portrait of President Lincoln with a yellow triangle nose against a salmon pink background flecked with blue triangles. This scene is entirely rendered in plush carpet that lacks detail creating a cartoon-like visual style. The person is standing facing to the right facing the portrait on a white wall. Part of another artwork appears at the left edge of the image in the background, giving the impression of a gallery space. He stands on floorboards of varying shades of brown that extend to the back wall of the space.
Jessica Campbell, Phoning it in, 2018. Acrylic rug on panel; 60 × 48 in. (152.4 × 121.9 cm). Photo: James Prinz, courtesy of Western Exhibitions.
Jessica Campbell, Porn Cabbie, 2018. Acrylic rug and oil on panel; 30 × 40 in. (76.2 × 101.6 cm). Photo: James Prinz, courtesy of Western Exhibitions.
Jessica Campbell, Skinny dip, 2016. Acrylic rug on panel; 60 × 48 in. (152.4 × 121.9 cm). Photo: Robert Chase Heishman and Emily Kay Henson.
Jessica Campbell, The Crack-Up, 2018. Acrylic rug on panel; 36 × 24 in. (91.4 × 61 cm). Photo: James Prinz, courtesy of Western Exhibitions.
Jessica Campbell, Untitled, 2016. Ink and charcoal on paper; 30 × 30 in. (76.2 × 76.2 cm). Photo: Tim Johnson.
Jessica Campbell, Untitled, 2017. Ink and charcoal on paper; 11 × 14 in. (27.9 × 35.6 cm). Photo: Tim Johnson.

About

The satirical drawings, comics, and textiles by Chicago-based artist Jessica Campbell (Canadian, b. 1985) take aim at everyday experiences that reveal the sexism women face in the 21st century. Drawing from a wide range of influences including science fiction, art-world politics, and her Evangelical upbringing, she infuses her work with humor and vulnerability. Her recently published graphic novels include Hot or Not: 20th-Century Male Artists (2016) and XTC69 (2018).

The exhibition is organized by Nina Wexelblatt, Curatorial Assistant. It is presented in the Dr. Paul and Dorie Sternberg Family Gallery and Ed and Jackie Rabin Gallery on the museum’s third floor.

Funding

Generous support for Chicago Works: Jessica Campbell is provided by the Sandra and Jack Guthman Chicago Works Exhibition Fund.