Tania Pérez Córdova: Smoke, nearby

Images

  • A sheet of hard glass is folded over and bent in two as if it were a plastic bag. A smoking stick rests between the green edges of the glass and a plume of smoke wafts upward.
  • A right hand reaches in from out of the frame, with a colored contact lens resting on its extended pointer finger.
  • Two contact lenses with brown and orange irises and clear edges sit side by side on a piece of black-and-white marble.
  • A close up image of a bronze-colored strip of metal cutting horizontally across the frame, with a single diamond earring dangling from its center. Another bent piece of similar metal is shown out of focus above and behind it.
  • A photograph of part of a dark haired woman's head, revealing her neck, cheek, and jaw, with an obviously missing earring in her right ear.
  • An image of an undulating sheet of clear glass, seemingly melted into this shape, on top of which is pooled a strip of bright green liquid.
A sheet of hard glass is folded over and bent in two as if it were a plastic bag. A smoking stick rests between the green edges of the glass and a plume of smoke wafts upward.
  1. Long A sheet of hard glass is folded over and bent in two as if it were a plastic bag. A smoking stick rests between the green lips that comprise the edges of the glass. A dark circular shadow dominates the area to the right of the glass, a stark contrast to the white background.
Tania Pérez Córdova, They say it’s like a rock, 2015. Glass from a window facing south and Nag Champa incense; 21 × 29 × 24 cm. Courtesy of the artist and joségarcía, mx. Image courtesy of the artist.
Tania Pérez Córdova, Untitled, 2015. Bronze poured into sand; approx. 97.2 × 89.7 × 1.8 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
A right hand reaches in from out of the frame, with a colored contact lens resting on its extended pointer finger.
Tania Pérez Córdova, Cosmetic contact lens on finger, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.
Two contact lenses with brown and orange irises and clear edges sit side by side on a piece of black-and-white marble.
Tania Pérez Córdova, Even, 2016. Marble, personalized color contact lenses, and a person wearing color contact lenses from a different color than their natural eyes; 39.5 × 32 × 2.5 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
A close up image of a bronze-colored strip of metal cutting horizontally across the frame, with a single diamond earring dangling from its center. Another bent piece of similar metal is shown out of focus above and behind it.
Tania Pérez Córdova, We focus on a woman facing sideways, 2013–16. Bronze, Swarovski Crystal Drop earring, and a woman wearing the other earring; 36 × 18 in. (91.2 × 46 cm). Image courtesy of the artist.
A photograph of part of a dark haired woman's head, revealing her neck, cheek, and jaw, with an obviously missing earring in her right ear.
Tania Pérez Córdova, A woman turning left, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.
An image of an undulating sheet of clear glass, seemingly melted into this shape, on top of which is pooled a strip of bright green liquid.
Tania Pérez Córdova, They say what they can, 2015. Glass from a window facing north and Avene soap-free cleansing gel; 18.3 × 75.3 × 31.7 cm. Courtesy of the artist and joségarcía, mx.

Tania Pérez Córdova (Mexican, b. 1979) is an artist based in Mexico City whose sculptural compositions suggest the passing of time. Inscribed in her seemingly static pieces are hints of an active contemporary life: a borrowed gold earring is suspended from a bronze cast, an active credit card is inserted in a clay platter, a stranger’s SIM card is embedded in a porcelain slab. These objects make visible the artist’s negotiations with third parties—with the women left without one gold earring, with the credit card user, the bank, and the whole credit system. The sculptures are all of us, our relationship to digital communication.

Pérez Córdova’s interest in quotidian events underlines how unremarkable situations can be compelling acts associated with a complex infrastructure of social or economic relationships. They are performative works that do not move, “contemporary relics,” as she calls them. Pérez Córdova’s Ascendant Artist exhibition will be her first solo museum presentation in the United States.

The exhibition is organized by José Esparza Chong Cuy, Pamela Alper Associate Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

The exhibition is presented in the Bergman Family Gallery on the museum's second floor.

Funding

Lead support for Tania Pérez Córdova: Smoke, nearby is provided by the Harris Family Foundation in memory of Bette and Neison Harris: Caryn and King Harris, Katherine Harris, Toni and Ron Paul, Pam and Joe Szokol, Linda and Bill Friend, and Stephanie and John Harris; the Margot and W. George Greig Ascendant Artist Fund; Helen and Sam Zell; Anne L. Kaplan; and Cari and Michael Sacks.

Major support is provided by Sally Meyers Kovler and Jonathan Kovler, Elissa Efroymson and Adnaan Hamid, and Marilyn and Larry Fields.

Generous support is provided by The Robey, and Jorge Cauz and Ugo Alfano Casati.

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